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  2. Wireless access point - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wireless_access_point

    In computer networking, a wireless access point (WAP), or more generally just access point (AP), is a networking hardware device that allows other Wi-Fi devices to connect to a wired network. As a standalone device, the AP may have a wired connection to a router , but, in a wireless router , it can also be an integral component of the router ...

  3. Rogue access point - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rogue_access_point

    Soft access point. A "soft access point" (soft AP) can be set up on a Wi-Fi adapter using for example Windows' virtual Wi-Fi or Intel's My WiFi. This makes it possible, without the need of a physical Wi-Fi router, to share the wired network access of one computer with wireless clients connected to that soft AP.

  4. Wi-Fi - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wi-Fi

    A wireless access point (WAP) connects a group of wireless devices to an adjacent wired LAN. An access point resembles a network hub, relaying data between connected wireless devices in addition to a (usually) single connected wired device, most often an Ethernet hub or switch, allowing wireless devices to communicate with other wired devices.

  5. Lightweight Access Point Protocol - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lightweight_Access_Point...

    Lightweight Access Point Protocol (LWAPP) is the name of a protocol that can control multiple Wi-Fi wireless access points at once. This can reduce the amount of time spent on configuring, monitoring or troubleshooting a large network. The system will also allow network administrators to closely analyze the network.

  6. Femtocell - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Femtocell

    Access Point Base Stations are also required, since carrying voice calls, to provide a 911 (or 999, 112, etc.) emergency service, as is the case for VoIP phone providers in some jurisdictions. This service must meet the same requirements for availability as current wired telephone systems, such as functioning during a power failure.

  7. WiMAX - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/WiMAX

    Both IEEE 802.11, which includes Wi-Fi, and IEEE 802.16, which includes WiMAX, define Peer-to-Peer (P2P) and wireless ad hoc networks, where an end user communicates to users or servers on another Local Area Network (LAN) using its access point or base station. However, 802.11 supports also direct ad hoc or peer to peer networking between end ...

  8. Wireless community network - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wireless_community_network

    A Patras Wireless Network (PWN) access point, the first city-wide wireless community network in Greece. Houston Wireless was founded in summer 2001 as the Houston Wireless Users Group. The telecommunications providers were slow to roll out third-generation wireless ( 3G ), so Houston Wireless was established to promote high-speed wireless ...

  9. Hotspot (Wi-Fi) - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hotspot_(Wi-Fi)

    Public hotspots are typically created from wireless access points configured to provide Internet access, controlled to some degree by the venue. In its simplest form, venues that have broadband Internet access can create public wireless access by configuring an access point (AP), in conjunction with a router to connect the AP to the Internet. A ...