Luxist Web Search

  1. Results From The WOW.Com Content Network
  2. William Lynch speech - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/William_Lynch_speech

    Some online versions of the text attach introductions, such as a foreword attributed to Frederick Douglass, or citations falsely giving Lynch's name as the source of the word "lynching". [4] The text of the speech has been published since at least 1970, [4] and is often published with the title "The Making of a Slave".

  3. Philosophy, politics and economics - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Philosophy,_politics_and...

    History. Philosophy, politics and economics was established as a degree course at the University of Oxford in the 1920s, as a modern alternative to classics (known as "literae humaniores" or "greats" at Oxford) because it was thought as a more modern alternative for those entering the civil service.

  4. Michael Morell - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Michael_Morell

    Michael Joseph Morell (/ m ə ˈ r ɛ l /; born September 4, 1958) is an American former career intelligence analyst.He served as the deputy director of the Central Intelligence Agency from 2010 to 2013 and twice as its acting director, first in 2011 and then from 2012 to 2013.

  5. Harry Emerson Fosdick - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Harry_Emerson_Fosdick

    Harry Emerson Fosdick (May 24, 1878 – October 5, 1969) was an American pastor. Fosdick became a central figure in the Fundamentalist–Modernist controversy within American Protestantism in the 1920s and 1930s and was one of the most prominent liberal ministers of the early 20th century.

  6. Rumi - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rumi

    The mother of Rumi was Mu'mina Khātūn. The profession of the family for several generations was that of Islamic preachers of the relatively liberal Hanafi Maturidi school, and this family tradition was continued by Rumi (see his Fihi Ma Fih and Seven Sermons) and Sultan Walad (see Ma'rif Waladi for examples of his everyday sermons and lectures).

  7. Idiom - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Idiom

    An idiom is a phrase or expression that typically presents a figurative, non-literal meaning attached to the phrase; but some phrases become figurative idioms while retaining the literal meaning of the phrase.

  8. Georgian language - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Georgian_language

    Georgian (ქართული ენა, romanized: kartuli ena, pronounced [kʰɑɾt̪ʰuli ɛnɑ]) is the most widely-spoken of the Kartvelian languages and serves as the literary language or lingua franca for speakers of related languages.

  9. Sacco and Vanzetti - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sacco_and_Vanzetti

    Nicola Sacco (pronounced [niˈkɔːla ˈsakko]; April 22, 1891 – August 23, 1927) and Bartolomeo Vanzetti (pronounced [bartoloˈmɛːo vanˈtsetti, -ˈdzet-]; June 11, 1888 – August 23, 1927) were Italian immigrant anarchists who were controversially accused of murdering a guard and a paymaster during the April 15, 1920, armed robbery of the Slater and Morrill Shoe Company in Braintree ...