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  2. Windows Live Mail - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Windows_Live_Mail

    Windows Live Mail (formerly named Windows Live Mail Desktop, code-named Elroy) was a freeware email client from Microsoft.It is the successor to Windows Mail in Windows Vista, which was the successor to Outlook Express in Windows XP and Windows 98.

  3. Microsoft Office 2021 - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Microsoft_Office_2021

    It enhances Ink for Translate in Microsoft Outlook and PowerPoint. It also has better co-authoring features. References This page was last edited on 3 December 2021 ...

  4. Microsoft Search Server - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Microsoft_Search_Server

    Microsoft Search Server (MSS) was an enterprise search platform from Microsoft, based on the search capabilities of Microsoft Office SharePoint Server. MSS shared its architectural underpinnings with the Windows Search platform for both the querying engine and the indexer.

  5. History of Microsoft - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/History_of_Microsoft

    2011–2014: Windows 8, Xbox One, Outlook.com, and Surface devices. Following the release of Windows Phone, Microsoft underwent a gradual rebranding of its product range throughout 2011 and 2012—the corporation's logos, products, services and websites adopted the principles and concepts of the Metro design language.

  6. Application Request Routing - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Application_Request_Routing

    Application Request Routing (ARR) is an extension to Internet Information Server (IIS), which enables an IIS server to function as a load balancer. With ARR, an IIS server can be configured to route incoming requests to one of multiple web servers using one of several routing algorithms.

  7. Email address - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Email_address

    An email address identifies an email box to which messages are delivered. While early messaging systems used a variety of formats for addressing, today, email addresses follow a set of specific rules originally standardized by the Internet Engineering Task Force (IETF) in the 1980s, and updated by RFC 5322 and 6854.