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  2. Should you contribute to a 401(k) over the age of 65? - AOL

    www.aol.com/2009/01/01/should-you-contribute-to...

    More and more of our readers are going back to work after retirement because they need the money. Some are offered 401(k) plans by their employers. They wonder whether or not they should ...

  3. Costco and 23 More Companies With Surprisingly Great 401(k) Plans

    www.aol.com/finance/costco-23-more-companies...

    In addition to offering employees a profit-sharing retirement plan, it offers pretax and after-tax 401(k) plans with a company match. Employees get a 100% match of contributions of up to 3% of ...

  4. Workers willing to work longer to save Social Security

    www.aol.com/finance/workers-willing-longer-save...

    July 12, 2022, 9:13 AM. Retirement savers are willing to put in more work — literally — to keep Social Security afloat. Nearly 6 in 10 people under 55 said they would work two years or more to ...

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  6. Solo 401(k) - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Solo_401(k)

    A Solo 401 (k) (also known as a Self Employed 401 (k) or Individual 401 (k)) is a 401 (k) qualified retirement plan for Americans that was designed specifically for employers with no full-time employees other than the business owner (s) and their spouse (s). The general 401 (k) plan gives employees an incentive to save for retirement by ...

  7. Cash balance plan - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cash_balance_plan

    Cash balance plans are defined-benefit plans that look like defined-contribution plans. A worker's right to a pension in a defined-benefit plan represents a contingent liability, and hence an uncertain financial obligation to the employer sponsoring the plan. Section 412 of the Code requires the employer to make annual contributions to the plan ...

  8. Roth 401(k) - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Roth_401(k)

    The Roth 401 (k) is a type of retirement savings plan. It was authorized by the United States Congress under the Internal Revenue Code, section 402A, [1] and represents a unique combination of features of the Roth IRA and a traditional 401 (k) plan. Since January 1, 2006, U.S. employers have been allowed to amend their 401 (k) plan document to ...