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  2. Tax equalization - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tax_equalization

    There are questions of who should pay taxes and how much should they pay. Usually, the individual is receiving a net pay, which is the money they would have received in their home country after taxation. However, the company is obliged to pay taxes for its employee. If they are working in a country with lower taxes, the company takes the savings.

  3. Criticism of Walmart - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Criticism_of_Walmart

    A lot of retailers, including Walmart, evaluate managers by a ratio of sales to payroll expense. Managers do not have direct control over sales, almost never making decisions on merchandise mix, layout, or pricing. However, they very much have direct control over payroll and when sales numbers drop, such managers are quick to reduce payroll.

  4. IRS tax forms - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/IRS_tax_forms

    As of the 2018 tax year, Form 1040, U.S. Individual Income Tax Return, is the only form used for personal (individual) federal income tax returns filed with the IRS. In prior years, it had been one of three forms (1040 [the "Long Form"], 1040A [the "Short Form"] and 1040EZ - see below for explanations of each) used for such returns.

  5. Capital gains tax - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Capital_gains_tax

    The tax rate of the capital gains tax depends on how much profit you gained and also on how much money you make annually. For example, in the UK the CGT is currently ( tax year 2021-22) 10% of the profit if your income is under £50,000, then it is 20% if your income exceeds this limit.

  6. FairTax - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/FairTax

    FairTax was a single rate tax proposal in 2005, 2008 and 2009 in the United States that includes complete dismantling of the Internal Revenue Service. The proposal would eliminate all federal income taxes (including the alternative minimum tax, corporate income taxes, and capital gains taxes), payroll taxes (including Social Security and Medicare taxes), gift taxes, and estate taxes, replacing ...

  7. Sugary drink tax - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sugary_drink_tax

    A sugary drink tax, soda tax, or sweetened beverage tax (SBT) is a tax or surcharge (food-related fiscal policy) designed to reduce consumption of sweetened beverages.Drinks covered under a soda tax often include carbonated soft drinks, sports drinks and energy drinks.