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  2. Cube root - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cube_root

    The cube root is the inverse function of the cube function if considering only real numbers, but not if considering also complex numbers: although one has always () =, the cube of a nonzero number has more than one complex cube root and its principal cube root may not be the number that was cubed.

  3. nth root - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nth_root

    A root of degree 2 is called a square root and a root of degree 3, a cube root. Roots of higher degree are referred by using ordinal numbers, as in fourth root, twentieth root, etc. The computation of an n th root is a root extraction. For example, 3 is a square root of 9, since 3 2 = 9, and −3 is also a square root of 9, since (−3) 2 = 9.

  4. Square–cube law - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Square–cube_law

    Steam engine: James Watt, working as an instrument maker for the University of Glasgow, was given a scale model Newcomen steam engine to put in working order. Watt recognized the problem as being related to the square–cube law, in that the surface to volume ratio of the model's cylinder was greater than that of the much larger commercial engines, leading to excessive heat loss.

  5. Square root of 5 - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Square_root_of_5

    The square root of 5 is the positive real number that, when multiplied by itself, gives the prime number 5. It is more precisely called the principal square root of 5 , to distinguish it from the negative number with the same property.

  6. Square root of 3 - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Square_root_of_3

    The square root of 3 is the positive real number that, when multiplied by itself, gives the number 3. It is denoted mathematically as √ 3 or 3 1/2. It is more precisely called the principal square root of 3, to distinguish it from the negative number with the same property. The square root of 3 is an irrational number.

  7. Cubic mile - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cubic_mile

    A cubic mile (abbreviation: cu mi or mi 3) is an imperial and US customary (non-SI non-metric) unit of volume, used in the United States, Canada and the United Kingdom.It is defined as the volume of a cube with sides of 1 mile (63360 inches, 5280 feet, 1760 yards or ~1.609 kilometres) in length.

  8. Hippasus - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hippasus

    Life. Little is known about the life of Hippasus. He may have lived in the late 5th century BC, about a century after the time of Pythagoras. Metapontum in Italy (Magna Graecia) is usually referred to as his birthplace, although according to Iamblichus some claim Metapontum to be his birthplace, while others the nearby city of Croton.

  9. Triangular number - Wikipedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Triangular_number

    The digital root pattern for triangular numbers, repeating every nine terms, as shown above, is "1, 3, 6, 1, 6, 3, 1, 9, 9". The converse of the statement above is, however, not always true. For example, the digital root of 12, which is not a triangular number, is 3 and divisible by three.